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Classic and Moderate Forms of “Calvinism” Documented Thus Far

January 17, 2008

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For Whom Did Christ Die

Early Church and Medieval Patristics

Saint Ambrose (337-397): the Source of an Idea

Athanasius (293-373) on the Incarnation

Chrysostom (347-407) on the Death of Christ

Augustine (354–430) on the Death of Christ

Prosper of Aquitaine (c.390-c.455) on Redemption

Pope Leo the Great (400-461) on the Death of Christ

Peter Lombard on the Death of Christ: Christ died for all sufficiently, for the elect efficiently

Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) on the Death of Christ: Its Nature and Extent

Classic and Moderate Forms of “Calvinism” Documented Thus Far

Reformation Era

Johannes Oecolampadius (1482–1531) on the Death of Christ

Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531) on the Unlimited Expiation and Unlimited Redemption

William Tyndale (1494–1536) on the Death of Christ

Martin Luther on John 1:29 (unedited and complete)

Martin Luther (1483–1546) on the Death of Christ

Thomas Cranmer (1489-1556) on Death of Christ

Erasmus Sarcerius (1501-1559) on the Death of Christ

Peter Martyr Vermigli (1499–1562): Unlimited Redemption and Expiation, Incarnation and Related Issues

Vermigli on Hebrews 2:9 and 14

Augustine Marlorate (1506-1562) on the Death of Christ

Wolfgang Musculus (1497-1563) on the Redemption of Mankind

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Unlimited Expiation, Sin-Bearing, Redemption and Reconciliation

Miles Coverdale (1488-1568) on the Death of Christ

Pierre Viret on the Death of Christ

Benedictus Aretius (1505-1574) on the Death of Christ

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on Unlimited Expiation and Unlimited Redemption

Thomas Lever (1521–1577) on Redeemed Souls Perishing

Rudolph Gualther (1519-1586) on the Death of Christ

Some Classic Calvinist Comments on Hebrews 10:29

Zachary Ursinus (1534–1583) on the Death of Christ

Zanchius (1516–1590) on the Death of Christ

Jeremias Bastingius (1551-1595) on the Death of Christ

Jacob Kimedoncius (d. 1596) on the Death of Christ: Unlimited Expiation and Redemption

Robert Rollock (1555-1599) on the Death of Christ and Related Issues

William Bucanus (d. 1603) on Unlimited and Limited Redemption

Batholomaeus Keckermann (1571-1609) on the Death of Christ

David Paraeus (1548-1622) on the Death of Christ: Unlimited Expiation and Redemption

Second Reformation Era

Richard Sibbes (1577-1635) on the Death of Christ

John Davenant (1572–1641) on the Death of Christ

William Twisse (1578–1646), the Forgotton Hypothetical Universalist

Thomas Adams (1583-1652) on the Death of Christ

James Usser (1581-1656) on the Extent and Intent of the Death of Christ

Henry Scudder (d. 1652): A Westminster Divine on the Death of Christ

Richard Vines (1600-1655/6) on the Death of Christ

Johannes Bergius (1587-1658) on the Death of Christ

Jean Daille (1594–1670) on the Death of Christ

Nathanael Hardy (1618-1670) on the Death of Christ

Joseph Truman (1631–1671) on the Death of Christ

Stephen Charnock (1628-1680) on the Death of Christ

John Bunyan (1628-1688) on the Death of Christ: Unlimited Expiation

John Howe (1630-1705) on the Redemption of Christ

Post-Reformation Era

John Humfrey (1621–1719) on the Death of Christ

James Saurin (1677-1730) on the Death of Christ

Experience Mayhew (1673-1758) on the Death of Christ

Jonathan Edwards (1703–1758) on the Death of Christ

James Richards (1767-1843) on the Death of Christ and the Extent of the Atonement

Thomas Chalmers (1780-1847) on the Death of Christ

Leonard Woods (1774-1854) on the Extent of the Atonement

John Brown of Broughton (1784–1858) on the Death of Christ

Gardner Spring (1785-1873) on Election, Unlimited Atonement and the Free Offer

Henry B. Smith (1815-1877) on the Extent of the Atonement

Charles Hodge (1797-1878) on the Death of Christ

Ransom B. Welsh on James Richards (1767-1843) on the Death of Christ

James M Pendleton (1811-1891) on the Extent of the Atonement

W.G.T. Shedd (1820–1894) on the Death of Christ

Robert L. Dabney (1820-1898) on Unlimited Expiation and Limited Redemption

God’s Will for the Salvation of all Men

God Desires Compliance to his Will and Commands as Standard Reformed Doctrine

John Wycliffe (1320s?-1384) on the Parables of the Lost Sheep and the Lost Coin

Erasmus Sarcerius (1501-1559) on God’s Will for the Salvation of All Men

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Christ Coming For and Seeking the Salvation of the World and Reprobates

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Lamentations 3:33

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Isaiah 44:22

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Matthew 23:37

John Calvin (1509-1564) on 2 Corinthians 5:20

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on God’s Will that None Perish (with Reference to Ezeliel 18:23 and 2 Peter 3:9)

Wolfgang Musculus on the Revealed Will

Peter Martyr Vermigli on God’s will for the salvation of all men

Andreas Hyperius (1511-1564) on God’s Desire that all Men be Saved

Rudolph Gualther (1519-1586) on the Will of God

Zachary Ursinus (1534–1583) on the Will of God

Amandus Polanus (1561-1610) on the Will of God

Ezekiel Culverwell on the Desire of God for the Salvation of All Men and the Well-Meant Offer

Johannes Bergius (1587-1658) on God’s Will and Desire for the Salvation of All Men

Samuel Rutherford (1600-1661) on God’s Desire that Men be Saved by ‘Will Revealed’

William Prynne (1600–1669) on God’s Will for the Salvation of All Men

Joseph Truman (1631–1671) on God’s Will for the Salvation of all Men

Edward Leigh (1602-1671) on the Will of God

Francis Turretin (1623-1687) on the Will of God: Its Two-Fold aspect

Francis Turretin (1623-1687) on God Desiring and Wishing that All Men be Saved

John Bunyan (1628-1688) on God’s Willingness to Save All Men

James Saurin on God’s Will for the Salvation of Sinners

Hermann Venema on God’s Will that All Men be Saved

Andrew Fuller on the Will of God for the Salvation of Sinners

Robert Candlish (1806-1873) on God’s Will and Desire for the Salvation of All Men

Henry B. Smith (1815-1877) on the Will of God

John L. Dagg (1794-1884) on the Revealed Will

W.G.T. Shedd on God’s desire and compassion for the salvation of all men

Berkhof on the Will of God for Salvation of All Men

Samuel Waldron on God’s Will and Desire for the Salvation of All Men

Erroll Hulse on God’s Love and Will For the Salvation of All Men

Sources on God’s Goodness

John Calvin (1509-1564) on God’s Goodness To All

Wolfgang Musculus on the Goodness of God

Stephen Charnock on the Goodness and Severity of God

Edward Leigh on the Goodness of God

Benedict Pictet (1655-1724) on God’s General Goodness and Love

Wilhelmus a’ Brakel on the Goodness of God

John Dick on the Goodness of God: General and Special

John Brown of Haddington (1722-1787) on God’s Goodness: General and Special

Louis Berkhof (1873-1957) on the Goodness of God

The Historicity of the Reformed Doctrine of Electing and non-Electing love

Thomas Aquinas on the Love of God

Martin Luther on General Love

Martin Bucer on General Love

Wolfgang Musculus on the Love of God

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on God’s Love to Mankind

John Calvin (1509-1564) on General Love

Andreas Hyperius (1511-1564) on God’s Providential Love to Mankind

Augustine Marlorate on the Love and Goodwill of God to Mankind

Benedictus Aretius on God as the Lover of Mankind

John Knox on General Love

Zachary Ursinus (1534–1583) on the General Love of God

Jerome Zanchi (1516–1590) on the Love of God: General and Special

Jacob Kimedoncius on General Love

Amandus Polanus on the General Love of God

Lucas Trelcatius (1573-1607) on the Gracious Call and General Love to all Men

William Sclater (1575-1627) on the General Love of God

John Davenant on God’s General Love to Mankind

The Westminster Annotations on the Bible: John 3:16 and Electing and Non-electing Love

Richard Sibbes (1577-1635) on General Love

Hugh Binning (1627–1653) on God’s General Love: With Reference to Matthew 5:44-45

George Swinnock on General and Special Love

Samuel Rutherford (1600-1661) on General Love

David Dickson (1583-1662) on God’s Love and Goodness to Man

Nathanael Hardy (1618-1670) on General Love

Thomas Manton (1620-1677) on General Love

William Bates (1625-1699) on General and Special Love

John Trapp (1601-1669) on God’s General Love: By Way of his Comment on Acts 14:17

Edward Leigh (1602-1671) on General Love

Joseph Truman (1631–1671) on the Love of God: General and Special

David Clarkson on Non-Electing Love

John Owen (1616-1683) on General Love

Stephen Charnock (1628-1680) on General Love

Francis Turretin (1623-1687) on General Love

John Bunyan (1628-1688) on General and Special Love

Wilhelmus a’ Brakel on General Love

Experience Mayhew (1673-1758) on God’s Love to Mankind With Regard to Matt 12:37, John 3:16, 1 John 2:2 and 2 Peter 3:9

Jonathan Edwards on General Love

Thomas Boston (1676-1732) on the Love of God

John Dick on God’s Geneal Love and Goodness

Andrew Fuller on God’s General Love

George Whitefield on God’s Love for All Declared in the Gospel

Hermann Venema (1697-1787) on the Love of God: General and Special

Heinrich Heppe and the Reformed Doctrine of General Love

Thomas Chalmers (1780-1847) on God’s Love to the World, with Reference to John 3:16, 1 John 2:2, and Unlimited Expiation

John Brown of Broughton (1784–1858) on God’s Love to the World

William Bullein Johnson on God’s General Love in Relation to John 3:16

James Henly Thornwell on God’s General Love and Matthew 5:44-55

Charles Hodge (1797–1878) on the Love of God: General and Special

James P. Boyce on the Love of God: General and Special

W.G.T. Shedd (1820-1894) on God’s Universal and Special Love

Geerhardus Voss (1862-1949) on the General and Special Love of God

Louis Berkhof (1873-1957) on the Love of God

John Murray on Matthew 5:44-48

DA Carson on the Love of God

The Doctrine of Common Grace in Augustinian and Reformed Theology

Prosper on God’s General Grace

Calvin’s Doctrine of the Grace of God

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Special and Common Grace

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on General and Saving Grace

Jerome Zanchi (1516–1590) on the Grace of God: Common and Special

Johannes Wollebius on Common Special Grace in the Light of Depravity Due to Sin

John Davenant: The Reprobate Not Denied Sufficient Grace

William Sclater (1575-1627) on Common Grace

George Swinnock on Common Grace

Robert Harris (Westminster Divine) on Common and Saving Grace

James Durham (1622-1658) Westminster Divine on the Differences Between Common and Saving Grace

Samuel Rutherford on Non-Saving Preparatory Grace

Joseph Truman (1631–1671) on General and Special Grace; With Reference to Paradox of God’s Will for the Salvation of All Men and Special Election

Stephen Charnock on Common Grace

John Marbeck (ca. 1510-ca.1585) on the Grace of God

William Jenkyn (1613-1685) on Common Restraining Grace

Francis Turretin (1613-1687) on Common and Special Grace

Francis Turretin (1613-1687): the Reprobate Not Denied All of God’s Favour

John Owen on Common Grace

Edward Leigh on God’s Grace

Edward Polhill (1622-1694) on Common Grace: Informal References

William Burkitt (1650-1703) on Common Grace

Wilhelmus a’ Brakel (1635-1711) on Common Grace

Robert Traill (1642-1716) on Common and Special Grace

John Humfrey (1621-1719) on Common and Special Grace

Benedict Pictet (1655-1724) on Common Grace

Thomas Ridgeley (1667?-1734) on Common and Special Restraining Grace

Johannes VanderKemp on the three points of common grace

Experience Mayhew (1673-1758) on Common Grace

Samuel Davies (1723-1761) on Common Grace

Hermann Venema on Common and Special Grace

John Brown of Broughton (1784–1858) on the General and Special Aspects of the Mediation of Christ

Heinrich Heppe: Some Early References to the Reformed Doctrine of Common Grace

Heinrich Heppe: The Reprobate Are Not Denied Common Grace

Charles Hodge on Common Grace

AA Hodge on Common and Effectual Grace

Louis Berkhof (1873-1957) on the Grace of God

Louis Berkhof (1873-1957 ) on the Rationalist’s Objection to Common Grace

Sources on God’s Mercy

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Divine Mercy

Zachary Ursinus (1534–1583) on the General Mercy of God

Jerome Zanchi (1516–1590) on the Mercy of God: General and Special

William Ames on the Mercy of God

John Davenant on Divine Mercy and Justice

Samuel Otes (1578/9-1658) on Common and Special Mercy

William Jenkyn (1613-1685) on the Mercy of God: General and Special

a’ Brakel on General Mercy

Francis Turretin on the Mercy of God

Robert J. Breckinridge (1800-1871) on the Goodness, Grace and Mercy of God

Charles Hodge on the General Mercy of God

Sources on God’s Longsuffering

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on the Longsuffering of God

John Calvin (1509-1564) on God Giving Men Time to Repent

Elnathan Parr (1577-1622) on the Longsuffering of God

George Swinnock on the Longsuffering of God

Wilhemus a’ Brakel on the Longsuffering of God

James Saurin on the Longsuffering of God

Robert J. Breckinridge (1800-1871) on the Longsuffering of God

Robert Candlish on the Long-Suffering of God, in Relation to the Death of Christ

Sources on Divine Hatred

John Calvin (1509-1564) on God’s Hatred of Sin and Sinner

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on the Wrath of God

Zanchius on Divine Hatred

Amandus Polanus (1561-1610) on Divine Hatred

William Ames on Divine Hatred in Reprobation

John Davenant on Divine Hatred of Sin and Sinner

The Well-Meant Offer

Sarcerius Erasmus (1501-1559) on the Gospel

John Calvin (1509-1564) on How the Gospel Hardens

John Calvin (1509-1564) on the Free Offer of the Gospel (Selection)

John Calvin (1509-1564) on the Well-Meant Offer by way of Isaiah 65:2 and Romans 10:21

Augustine Marlorate on the Well-Meant Offer

Vermigli on the Free Offer

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on the Call and Offer of the Gospel

Thomas Lever (1521–1577) on the Earnest Call and the Death of Christ

Jean Taffin (1529–1602), The Offer of the Gospel: What it is, and What it is Not

Daniel Tossanus (1541-1602) on the Gracious Call of the Gospel

Robert Rollock on the Grace Call of God to the Elect and to the Reprobate

Lucas Trelcatius (1573-1607) on the Gracious Call and General Love to all Men

John Preston (1587-1628) on the Well-Meant Offer

John Ball (1585-1640) on the Free Offer of the Gospel

Richard Vines on the Free Offer

Thomas Ridgeley on the Free Offer

John Owen on the Sufficiency of Christ’s Death as the Foundation of the Gospel Offer

Thomas Jacombe (1623-1687) on the Well-Meant offer

Turretin on the Common Call

William Burkitt (1650-1703) on the Universal Tenders of the Gracious Gospel by way of Titus 2:11-12

The Gracious Offer of the Gospel by way of Titus 2:11-12 from the Matthew Henry Commentaries

Wilhemus a’ Brakel (1635-1711) on the Gracious Call and Gospel Offer

Johannes VanderKemp (1664-1718) on the Well-Meant Offer

Samuel Davies (1723-1761) on the Free Offer in Relation to the Death of Christ

Thomas Chalmers (1780-1847) on Particular Redemption and the Well-Meant Gospel Offer

William Bullein Johnson on the Well-Meant Offer

Gardiner Spring (1785-1873) on the Well-Meant Offer in Relation to the Death of Christ

Henry B. Smith (1815-1877) on the Well-Meant Offer and God’s Desire for the Salvation of All Men

Robert Dabney (1820-1898) on the Offer and Call of the Gospel

W.G.T. Shedd (1820-1894) on the Free Offer of the Gospel

John Murray on the Well-Meant Offer

Samuel Waldron on the Free Offer in Relation to God’s Desire that All Men Be Saved

Sources on Psalm 81:13

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Psalm 81:13

Westminster Annotations on Psalm 81:13

Matthew Henry (1662-1714) on Psalm 81:13

Sources on Ezekiel 18:23, 32; and 33:11

Luther on Ezekiel 18:23 and 32

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Ezekiel 18:23, 31-32 and 33:11: Relevant Citations

Augustine Marlorate on Ezekiel 18:23

Jerome Zanchi (1516–1590) on Ezekiel 18:23

Jacob Kimedoncius (d. 1596) on Ezekiel 18:32

Daniel Tossanus (1541-1602) on Ezekiel 18:23 and 32

Moses Amyraut (1596-1664) on Ezekiel 18:23

Joseph Truman (1631-1671) on Ezekiel 18:31-32

Thomas Manton (1620-1677) on Ezekiel 18:23

William Bates (1625-1699) on Ezekiel 18:23 and 33:11

Matthew Henry (1662-1714) on Ezekiel 18:23, 32; and 33:7-9 and 11

William Greenhill on Ezekiel 18:23, 32 and 33:11

Obadiah Hughes (1695-1751) on Ezekiel 33:11 (Informal Reference)

John Murray on Ezekiel 18:23,32; and 33:11

Sources on Matthew 23:37

Martin Luther on Matthew 23:37

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Matthew 23:37

Peter Martyr Vermigli on Matthew 23:37

Augustine Marlorate on Matthew 23:37

William Perkins (1558-1602) on Matthew 23:37

Hugh Binning (1627–1653) on Matthew 23:37

Theophilus Gale (1628-1678) on Matthew 23:37

Edward Polhill (1622-1694) on Matthew 23:37

William Burkitt (1650-1703) on Matthew 23:37

Matthew 23:37 from the Matthew Henry (1662-1714) Commentaries

Thomas Boston (1676-1732) on Matthew 23:37

Charles Spurgeon (1834-1892) on Matthew 23:37

John Murray on Matthew 23:37 and Luke 13:34

Sources on Luke 19:41

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Luke 19:41

Joseph Truman (1631–1671) on Luke 19:21 by way of His Discussion of Jesus’ Prayer in John 17

Theophilus Gale (1628-1678) on Luke 19:42

William Burkitt (1650-1703) on Luke 19:41

John Howe (1630-1705) on God’s Disposition to Lost Sinners by way of Luke 19:41

Robert Dabney (1820-1898) on Luke 19:41 and His Chastising the “Extremists” Calvinists

Sources on John 1:29

Chrysostom (347-407) on John 1:29-31

John Wycliffe (1320s?-1384) on John 1:29

Martin Luther on John 1:29

Zwingli on John 1:29

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on John 1:29

John Calvin (1509-1564) on John 1:29

Stephen Charnock on John 1:29

George Swinnock on John 1:29

John Newton (1725-1807) on John 1:29

Sources on John 3:16

Martin Luther on John 3:14-18

Wolfgang Musculus on John 3:16

John Calvin (1509-1564) on John 3:16

Thomas Becon (1512–1567) on John 3:16

Pierre Viret (1511-1571) on God’s Love to the World

Augustine Marlorate on John 3:16-17

Daniel Tossanus (1541-1602) on John 3:16

John Preston: An Informal Reference to John 3:16 and the True Sufficiency of Christ for all

Lud. Crocius on John 3:16

John Davenant on John 3:16

John Diodati on John 3:16

Thomas Adams on John 3:16

Hugh Binning (1627–1653) on John 3:16

Edmund Calamy (1600-1666) on John 3:16

John Trapp (1601-1669) on John 3:16

Ezekiel Culverwell on John 3:16

John Ball on John 3:16

John Arrowsmith on John 3:16

Joseph Truman (1631-1671) on John 3:16 and John 12:47

George Swinnock on John 3:16

Thomas Manton (1620-1677) on John 3:16

John Howe (1630-1705) on John 3:16

Edward Polhill (1622-1694) on God’s Love With Reference to John 3:16

William Burkitt (1650-1703) on John 3:14-17

John Humfrey (1621–1719) on John 3:16

James Saurin on John 3:16

Thomas Boston (1676-1732) on John 3:16

Ralph Wardlaw (1779-1853) on John 3:16

John Brown of Broughton (1784–1858) on John 3:16

Robert Candlish (1806-1873) on John 3:16

Charles Hodge on John 3:16

Robert Dabney (1820-1898) on 1 John 2:2 and John 3:16 (and 2 Cor 5:15)

Robert Dabney (1820-1898) on John 3:16

W.G.T. Shedd on John 3:16

DA Carson on John 3:16-17

Sources on Romans 2:4

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Romans 2:4

Andrew Willet on Romans 2:4

William Sclater (1575-1627) on Romans 2:4-5

John Trapp (1601-1669) on Romans 2:4

Jean Daille (1594–1670) on Romans 2:4; With Reference to Ezekiel 33:11

Thomas Gouge (1605-1681) Direct References and Allusions to Romans 2:4

John Flavel (1627-1691) on Romans 2:4

William Burkitt (1650-1703) on Romans 2:1-5

Romans 2:4 From the Matthew Henry (1662-1714) Commentaries

Hermann Venema on Romans 2:4

John Murray on Romans 2:4

Sources on Ephesians 2:3

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Ephesians 2:3

Paul Bayne on Ephesian 2:3

James Fergusson on Ephesians 2:3

Edward Leigh on Ephesians 2:3

Ephesians 2:3 from the Matthew Henry (1662-1714) Commentaries

F.F. Bruce on Ephesians 2:3

Leon Morris (1914-2006) on Ephesians 2:3

Andrew Lincoln on Ephesians 2:3

Sources on 1 Timothy 2:4, 5 and 6

Prosper on 1 Timothy 2:4

Thomas Aquinas on 1 Timothy 2:4

William Tyndale (1494–1536) on 1 Timothy 2:4

Martin Luther on 1 Timothy 2:4-6

Musculus: 1 Timothy 2:4 and the Preaching of the Gospel ‘Unto All’

John Calvin (1509-1564) on 1 Timothy 2:4-6

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on 1 Timothy 2:4

Peter Martyr Vermigli on 1 Timothy 2:4

Augustine Marlorate’s Passing Reference to 1 Timothy 2:4

Benedictus Aretius commenting on 1 Timothy 2:4

John de l’ Espine (1506-1597) on 1 Timothy 2:5: Informal Reference

Robert Rollock (1555-1599) on 1 Timothy 2:4

John Davenant on 1 Timothy 2:4

Thomas Adams on 1 Timothy 2:4 (with 2 Peter 3:9): An Informal Reference

Samuel Otes (1578/9-1658) on 1 Timothy 2:4: An Informal Reference

Edward Polhill (1622-1694) on 1 Timothy 2:4, (with Ezekiel 33:11)

John Howe (1630-1705) on God willing the salvation of all men (Ezekiel 18:32, 1Timothy 2:4, 2 Peter 3:9, John 3:16 etc)

Stephen Charnock on 1 Timothy 2:5-6

The Matthew Henry (1662-1714) Commentaries on 1 Timothy 2:1-6

William Burkitt (1650-1703) on 1 Timothy 2:3-5

Thomas Boston (1676-1732) on 1 Timothy 2:4

Charles Hodge on 1 Timothy 2:4

Henry B. Smith (1815-1877) on 1 Timothy 2:4 (With Reference to Hebrews 2:9)

Spurgeon on 1 Timothy 2:4

Robert Dabney (1820-1898) 1 Timothy 2:4-6

AA Hodge on 1 Timothy 2:4 and Ezekiel 18:23

Sources on Hebrews 2:9 and 14

Athanasius on Hebrews 2:9 and 14

Prosper’s affirmation of classic Incarnational Christology

Vermigli on Hebrews 2:9 and 14

David Paraeus on Hebrews 2:9

Stephen Charnock referencing Heb 2:9

Hebrews 2:9 and 14 from the Poole Commentaries

William Burkitt (1650-1703) on Hebrews 2:9 and 14

Sources on Hebrews 10:29

Peter Martyr Vermigli (1499-1563) on Hebrews 10:29

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Hebrews 10:29: Informal References

Thomas Lever (1521–1577) on Hebrews 10:29: An Informal Reference

David Paraeus (1548-1622) on Hebrews 10:29: An Informal Reference

William Bates (1625-1699) on Hebrews 10:29

Sources on 2 Peter 2:1 (and Jude 4)

Martin Luther on 2 Peter 2:1

John Calvin (1509-1564) on 2 Peter 2:1 and Jude 4

Augustine Marlorate on 2 Peter 2:1, by way of Jude 4

John Diodati on 2 Peter 2:1

Andrew Willet on 2 Peter 2:1 by way of Jude 4

Thomas Adams on 2 Peter 2:1

Archibald Symson on 2 Peter 2:1

John Cotton (1585–1652) on 2 Peter 2:1

The Westminster Annotations (Second Edition) on 2 Peter 2:1 and Jude 4

Samuel Otes (1578/9-1658) on Jude 4

2 Peter 2:1 from the Henry Commentaries

John Trapp (1601-1669) on 2 Peter 2:1

Nathanael Hardy (1618-1670) on 2 Peter 2:1 and Jude 4

John Mayer on 2 Peter 2:1

Charnock on 2 Peter 2:1

Richard Baxter on 2 Peter 2:1

William Burkitt (1650-1703) on 2 Peter 2:1

James Richards (1767-1843) on 2 Peter 2:1

Leonard Woods (1774-1854) on 2 Peter 2:1

James M. Pendleton (1811-1891) on 2 Peter 2:1

Douglas Kennard on 2 Peter 2:1

Sources on 2 Peter 3:9

John Calvin (1509-1564) on 2 Peter 3:9

Augustine Marlorate on 2 Peter 3:9

The Geneva Bible and 2 Peter 3:9

John Diodati on 2 Peter 3:9

David Paraeus on 2 Peter 3:9 and Roms 2:4

Thomas Adams on 2 Peter 3:9

Hugh Binning (1627–1653) on 2 Peter 3:9 and the Long-Suffering of God

John Arrowsmith (Westminster Divine) on 2 Peter 3:9

Thomas Manton (1620-1677) on 2 Peter 3:9

Edward Polhill (1622-1694) on 2 Peter 3:9, with Reference to John Calvin

William Burkitt (1650-1703) on 2 Peter 3:9

John Howe (1630-1705) on God willing the salvation of all men

Daniel de Superville (1657-1728) on 2 Peter 3:9

Thomas Boston (1676-1732) on 2 Peter 3:9

Ralph Wardlaw (1779-1853) on 2 Peter 3:9

Robert J. Breckinridge (1800-1871) on 2 Peter 3:9 in Relation to God’s Will for the Salvation of All Men

Richard Fuller Referencing Ezekial 33:11 and 2 Peter 3:9

John Murray on 2 Peter 3:9

Robert Letham on 2 Peter 3:9 in Response to John Owen on the Same

O. Palmer Robertson’s Footnote Comment on 2 Peter 3:9

Thomas Duke on 2 Peter 3:9

Sources on 1 John 2:2

Thomas Aquinas on 1 John 2:2

Martin Luther on 1 John 2:2

Musculus on 1 John 2:2

John Calvin (1509-1564) on 1 John 2:2 With Commentary by Charles Bell

Nathanael Hardy (1618-1670) on 1 John 2:2

Thomas Jacombe (1623-1687) on 1 John 2:2

William Burkitt (1650-1703) on 1 John 2:1-2

Charles Hodge on 1 John 2:2

W.G.T. Shedd on 1 John 2:2

Robert Dabney (1820-1898) on 1 John 2:2

Thomas Crawford on 1 John 2:2

The Divine Decree

The ‘Eodem Modo’ clause in the “Conclusion of the Synod of Dort”

John Davenant on the Danger of “Ordering” the Decrees of God

Turretin’s Critique of Supralapsarianism

James Saurin (1677-1730) on Supralapsarianism

Robert Dabney (1820-1898) on the Ordering of the Decrees

Charles Hodge on Ephesians 3:9-10

AA Hodge on Supra-Lapsarianism

Bavinck on Infra- and Supralapsarianism

G.C. Berkouwer on Infra- and Supralapsarianism

Sources on Predestination and Reprobation

Thomas Aquinas on Predestination and Reprobation

John Marbeck (ca. 1510-ca.1585) on Reprobation by way of Peter Martyr (1499-15620) and John Knox (1510-1572)

Amandus Polanus on Reprobation

Johannes Wollebius on Reprobation

William Sclater (1575-1627) on Reprobation

Edward Leigh on Reprobation

Wilhelmus à Brakel (1635-1711) on Election and Reprobation

John Brown of Haddington (1722-1787) on Divine Reprobation

Heinrich Heppe’s Summary of the Reformed Doctrine of Reprobation

John Murray Commenting on Romans 9:22-24

Sources on Divine Providence

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on the Providence of God

John Marbeck (ca. 1510-ca.1585) on the Providence of God

Amandus Polanus on the Providence of God

Johannes Wollebius on the Providence of God

Johannes Wollebius on Fall of Man and God’s Providence and Decree

Francis Turretin on Divine Concurrence

Sources on Divine Permission of Sin

The Second Helvetic Confession on Divine Permission of Sin

Archbishop James Ussher: The Irish Articles on Divine Permission of Sin

The Westminster Confession on Divine Permission of Sin

Thomas Aquinas on Divine Permission of Sin

Thomas Aquinas: God Does Not Will Evil

John Calvin (1509-1564) on God’s Willing Permission of Sin (A Selection of Relevant Comments)

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575): God Does Not Will Evil

Zachary Ursinus (1534–1583) on God’s Permission of Sin

John Marbeck (ca. 1510-ca.1585): God is not the Author or Proper Cause of Sin

Jean Taffin on Providence and Permission

Bucanus on Divine Permission of Sin

Amandus Polanus on Divine Permission of Sin

Johannes Wollebius on the Permissive Decree

Thomas Blake (1596-1657) on Reprobation and the Cause of Sin, by way of William Ames, Franciscus Gomarus, John Prideaux and John Ball

Edward Leigh on God’s Governance of Sin

Joseph Truman (1631–1671) on God’s Permissive Decree and the Salvation of Men

Turretin on God’s Providence Over Sin

Benedict Pictet (1655-1724) on God’s Governance of Sin

Experience Mayhew (1673-1758) on Divine Permission of Sin

John Brown of Haddington (1722-1787) on Divine Permission

Heinrich Heppe Divine Permission of Sin as Standard Reformed Doctrine

Henry B. Smith (1815-1877) on Divine Permission of Sin

AA Hodge on God’s Permission of Sin and Evil

Faith as Assurance

Wolfgang Fabricius Capito (1478-1541) on the Definition of Faith

John Calvin (1509-1564) on Faith as Assurance

Andreas Hyperius (1511-1564) on the Definition of Faith

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on Faith as a Sure and Steadfast Confidence

Peter Martyr Vermigli on Faith as Assured Assent

John Marbeck (ca. 1510-ca.1585) on What Faith Is

Jeremias Bastingius (1551-1595) on Faith as Assurance

Zachary Ursinus (1534–1583) on Faith as Assurance

John de l’ Espine (1506-1597) on Faith as Assurance

Bartholomaus Keckermann (1571-1609) on the Definition of Faith

Jean Daille as Faith as Assurance

John Colquhoun on Assurance of Salvation in Marrow Theology

The Work of the Trinity in the Work of Redemption

John Calvin (1509-1564) on the Economic Roles of the Trinity in the Work of Christ

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on the Will of the Father and the Will of the Son in the Redemption of the World

Davenant on the Work of the Trinity in the Work of Redemption

John Humfrey (1621–1719) on The Work of the Trinity in the Work of Redemption

Henry B. Smith (1815-1877) on the Work of the Trinity in the Work of Redemption

Charles Hodge (1797-1878) on the Work of the Trinity in the Work of Salvation

W.G.T. Shedd on Work of the Trinity in the Salvation of Man

Tony Lane on John Calvin and the Work of Trinity in Redemption

Curt Daniel on the Work of the Trinity in the Death of Christ

Double Payment/Double Jeopardy Fallacy (aka Owen’s Trilemma)

Zachary Ursinus (1534-1583) on Conditional Satisfaction (Contra the Double-Payment dilemma)

John Davenant and the Double Payment Fallacy

Edward Polhill on the Double Jeopardy/Double Payment fallacy

Nathanael Hardy (1618-1670) on Conditional Satisfaction (Contra the Double-Payment dilemma)

Joseph Bellamy (1719-1790) on the Double Jeopardy Fallacy

Edward D. Griffin (1770-1837) on the Double Payment Fallacy

Ralph Wardlaw (1779-1853) on the Double Payment Fallacy

Charles Hodge on the Double Payment/Double Jeopardy Fallacy

W.G.T. Shedd on Double Jeopardy and Double Payment

Robert Dabney (1820-1898) on the Double Payment Fallacy

Carl Trueman on Owen’s Double-Payment Dilemma

Negative Inference Fallacy

Robert Dabney (1820-1898): A Sharp Lesson on the Negative Inference fallacy

W.G. Samson on the Invalid Use of the Negative Inference

The Classic “Sufficient for all, Efficient for the elect” and its Revision

Classic

Peter Lombard on the Death of Christ: Christ died for all sufficiently, for the elect efficiently

Thomas Aquinas (c.390-c.455) on 1 Timothy 2:5 and Christ’s Sufficient Universal Redemption

Thomas Aquinas on the Sufficiency and Efficiency of Christ’s Death

John Calvin (1509-1564) on the Sufficiency and Efficiency of Christ’s Death

Peter Martyr Vermigli on the Sufficiency and Efficiency of Christ’s Death

Jeremias Bastingius (1551-1595) on the Sufficiency and Efficiency of Christ’s Death

William Bucanus (d. 1603) on the Sufficiency and Efficiency of Christ’s Death

David Paraeus on the Sufficiency and Efficiency of Christ’s Death

Arthur Dent (died 1607): Christ Died for all Sufficiently

Elnathan Parr (1577-1622) on the Sufficiency and Efficiency of Christ’s Death

William Sclater (1575-1627) on the Sufficiency and Efficiency of Christ’s Death

John Ball (1585-1640) on the Sufficiency and Efficiency of Christ’s Death

John Davenant on the Sufficiency and Efficiency of Christ’s Death

Richard Baxter (1615-1691) on the Sufficiency of Christ’s Death

Edward Polhill (1628-1694) on the Sufficieny of Christ’s Death with Regard to the Offer of the Gospel

Experience Mayhew (1673-1758) on the Sufficiency of Christ’s Death

William R. Weeks (1783-1848) on the Sufficiency of Christ’s Death Classically Defined and Defended

Charles Hodge (1797-1878) on the Sufficiency of Christ’s Satisfaction: As Classically Defined

Robert L. Dabney (1820-1898) on the Sufficiency of Christ’s Satisfaction: As Classically Defined

Revised

John Owen on the revision of the Sufficient-Efficient formula

Turretin on the Revised Sufficient-Efficient formula

Herman Witsius on the Revised Sufficient-Efficient Formula

Abraham Booth (1734-1806) on the Sufficiency of Christ’s Death

James Walker (1821-1891) on the revision of the Sufficient-Efficient formula

Heinrich Heppe’s brief survey of the Sufficient-Efficient formula

William Cunningham on the revision of the Sufficient-Efficient formula

AA Hodge on the revision of the Sufficient-Efficient formula

Berkhof acknowledging the change of language in the Sufficient-Efficient formula

Sources on the Doctrine of the Removal of Legal Obstacles

Moses Amyraut (1596-1664) on the Removal of Legal Obstacles

Calamy and Seaman on the Removal of Legal Obstacles

Joseph Truman (1631-1671) on the Removal of Legal Obstacles

Obadiah Hughes on the Removal of Legal Obstacles

The Marrow Theology on the Removal of Legal Obstacles

Samuel Davies (1723-1761) on the Removal of Legal Obstacles

John Brown of Haddington on the Removal of legal Obstacles

Charles Hodge on the Removal of Legal Obstacles

James M. Pendleton (1811-1891) on the Removal of Legal Obstacles

R. L. Dabney (1820-1898) on the Removal of Legal Obstacles

W.G.T. Shedd on the Removal of Legal Obstacles

AA Hodge on the Removal of Legal Obstacles

James P. Boyce on the Removal of Legal Obstacles

Contra

B.B. Warfield on the Removal of Legal Obstacles: An Exercise in Missing the Point

On the Distinction Between Pecuniary and Penal Satisfaction

Andrew Fuller on Pecuniary and Penal Satisfaction and the Role of Metaphor

Andrew Fuller (1754-1815) on the True Meaning of Imputation (Part 1)

Andrew Fuller (1754-1815): On the Nature of True Penal Substitution As Precluding Pecuniary Satisfaction (Part 2)

Edward D. Griffin (1770-1837) on the Danger of Conflating Pecuniary and Penal Categories

Andrew Robertson on the Distinction between Pecuniary and Penal Satisfaction: In Relation to the Sufficiency of the Atonement

Leonard Woods (1774-1854) on the Distinction between Pecuniary and Penal Satisfaction

Charles Hodge on Pecuniary and Penal Satisfaction and the Role of Metaphor

AA Hodge on Pecuniary and Penal Satisfaction

Robert Dabney (1820-1898) on the Distinction between Pecuniary and Penal Satisfaction

Samuel Spear on Pecuniary and Penal Satisfaction

J.I. Packer on Civil and Penal Debt

Knox Chamblin on Ransom as Deliverance: Not Payment

Douglas Kennard on the Non Pecuniary Nature of Petrine Redemption

Qualitative Equivalency Versus Quantitative Equivalency

Thomas Manton (1620-1677) on Christ Suffering the Tantundem, not the Idem of the Law’s Punishment

Joseph Truman (1631-1671) on Christ Suffering the Tantundem, not the Idem of the Law’s Punishment

Daniel Williams (1643?-1716) on Christ Suffering the Just Equivalent Not the Idem of the Law’s Punishment

John Dick on Christ Suffering the Just Equivalent Not the Quantum of the Law’s Punishment

Ralph Wardlaw (1779-1853) on Quantitative Equivalency Versus Qualitative Equivalency in the Death of Christ

Leonard Woods (1774-1854) on Quantitative Equivalency Versus Qualitative Equivalency in the Death of Christ

W.G.T. Shedd (1820–1894) on Quantitative Equivalency Versus Qualitative Equivalency in the Death of Christ

Contra

John Owen (1616-1683) on Christ Suffering the Idem, Not the Tantundem of the Law’s Punishment

On the Distinction Between Atonement and Redemption

Redemption and Atonement, Not the Same

Edward D. Griffin (1770-1837) on the Distinction Between Atonement and Redemption

William R. Weeks (1783-1848) on the Distinction Between Atonement and Redemption

Bennet Tyler (1783-1858) on the Distinction Between Atonement and Redemption, By Way of Two Secondary Sources

Ransom B. Welsh on the Distinction Between Atonement and Redemption

John L. Dagg (1794-1884), Referencing the Distinction Between Atonement and Redemption

W.G.T. Shedd (1820–1894) on the Distinction Between Atonement and Redemption

Robert L. Dabney (1820-1898) on the Distinction Between Atonement and Redemption

Pre-20th Century Historiography on Calvin on the Extent of the Atonement

Andrew Willet

John Davenant (1572–1641)

Isaac Watts (1674–1748)

Edward Williams (1750-1813)

Thomas Scott (1747-1821)

Elijah Waterman

Edward D. Griffin

James Richards

Thomas H. Skinner (1791-1871)

Owen Thomas

Biblical Notes and Queries

Diversity at Dort

The Delegates from Hesse on the Death of Christ

The Delegates from Gelderland on the Death of Christ

The Bremen delegates at Dort

The Delegates from Wetteraw on the Death of Christ

Bishop George Carleton on the Death of Christ

John Hales, English Chaplain at Dort

Early Confessions and the Extent of the Atonement

A.A. Hodge on the atonement and its modification in confessional theology due to the rise of Federal Theology

Confessional Fragments from Zwingli on the Death of Christ

Calvin, The Consensus Tigurinus and the Reconciliation of God to the World

English Confession of Faith and the Death of Christ

The Thirty-Nine Articles and the Atonement

The Second Helvetic Confession and the Atonement

The Heidelberg Catechism and the Death of Christ

Catechism Minor Eccl. Tigurinus and the Extent of the Atonement

Dort on the Death of Christ

Robert Dabney (1820-1898) on Question 37 of the Heidelberg Catechism

The United Presbyterian Church Declaratory Act of 1879

Richard Muller on Dort: What Dort Actually Does and Does Not Affirm

Robert Letham on the English Hypothetical Universalists at the Westminster Assembly

Sources on Amyraldianism, Amyraut, and Testard

Amyraut on the ordering of the decrees

Amyraut affirms the classic Lombardian distinctions

Testard affirms the classic Lombardian distinctions

Theophilus Gale (1628-1678) on Davenant and Amyraut

Laurence Proctor on Amyraut’s “Christ Died Equally For All”

Richard Muller on Amyraut

Richard Muller on Non-Amyraldian Precedents to Hypothetical Universalism

Carl R. Trueman on Amyraldianism

Sources on ‘Conditional Decree/Will’

Predestination/Election

Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) on Conditional Predestination

Erasmus Sarcerius on Conditional Predestination

Martin Bucer on Conditional Predestination

Amyraut on Conditional Predestination

Twisse on Bucer on Conditional Predestination

Jacob Kimedoncius on Musculus: All Men Conditionally Appointed to Life

Jerome Zanchi (1516–1590) on All Men are Bound to Believe in their Election in Christ

Twisse on Zanchi on Conditional Election

Davenant on Bucer (with Zanchi) on ‘Each Man is Bound to Believe he has been Elected’

William Sclater (1575-1627) on Zanchi on ‘Each Man is Bound to Believe he has been Elected’

Experience Mayhew (1673-1758) on Twisse on “Each Man is Bound to Believe that Christ Died for Him”

Matthew Harmon on Amyraut on ‘General Conditional Election’

Decree

John Davanent on Conditional Decree

Bishop Joseph Hall (1574–1656), on “Conditional Decree” and “Will” in Early Reformation Theology

Amyraut and Testard and the Synod of Alancon on ‘Conditional Will,’ ‘Conditional Decree,’ and ‘Conditional Predestination’

Richard Baxter (1615-1691) on God’s Conditional Decree

Edward Polhill on ‘Conditional Decree’ as Will Revealed

Intention

John Davenant on the Conditional and Revealed ‘Intention’ of God for the Salvation of All Men

Theophilus Gale (1628-1678) on the Divine Intentionality of the Revealed Will

Will

John Calvin (1509-1564) on God’s Conditional Will

Jerome Zanchi (1516–1590) the Conditional Will of God

Amyraut on God’s Conditional Will for the Salvation of All Men

Amandus Polanus on God’s Conditional Revealed Will

Johannes Wollebius on God’s Conditional Revealed Wil

Ezekiel Culverwell on God’s Conditonal Will in Relation to the Free Offer of the Gospel

Edward Leigh on God’s Conditional Revealed Will

Richard Baxter (1615-1691) on God’s Conditional Will

God’s Conditional Covenant with Mankind

Zwingli on God’s New Covenant with the Human Race

Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575) on God’s Covenant with Mankind

Hypothetical and Universal Covenant of Grace: An Early Source

John Davenant on the Covenant: Conditional and Absolute

John Preston on the Covenant of Grace: Absolute and Particular and Conditional and Universal

Richard Vines (Westminster Divine) and the Foedus Hypotheticum (with reference to John 3:16)

Obadiah Sedgwick on the Foedus Hypotheticum

Nathanael Hardy (1618-1670) on the Covenant

Richard Baxter (1615-1691) on God’s Conditional Covenant with All Mankind

Calvin and Heshusius

John Calvin and Tileman Heshusius

Understanding Calvin’s Argument Against Heshusius

Curt Daniel on Calvin and Heshusius

Charles Bell on Calvin and Heshusius

Alan Clifford on Calvin and Heshusius

G. Michael Thomas on Calvin and Heshusius

Pieter Rouwendal on Calvin and Heshusius

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6 Comments leave one →
  1. CalvinandCalvinism permalink*
    January 17, 2008 12:53 pm

    Hey Mark,

    I chose that wording to be very careful in what I am trying to communicate. If I had simply said “moderate” then one might claim I am claiming that all the authors here understood the expiation univocally. Rather, what I wanted to communicate was that all these authors have sought to synthesize the diverse aspects of universality and particularism in Augustinian-predestinarian thought in different ways.

    I think some more on a better title.

    David

  2. January 17, 2008 1:49 pm

    Maybe you could call it classic forms of calvinism? Maybe John Calvin’s brand of calvinism? ;)

    Terry

  3. CalvinandCalvinism permalink*
    January 17, 2008 1:55 pm

    Hey Terry,

    I could, but that might be problematic too. :-) Perhaps Bullinger may take umbrage? Or Prosper? :-)

    I might change it to: Moderated Forms of Augustinianism Documented Thus Far

    But really, how many true Augustinians are out there today? ;-)

    Thanks
    David

  4. January 17, 2008 5:31 pm

    How about biblically balanced reformed soteriology?

    biblical Augustinian soteriology?

    Historic Augustinianism?

    ;)

Trackbacks

  1. once more with feeling » Great, but why “moderated”?
  2. Can a person be considered "Reformed" if they don't affirm the five points? - The PuritanBoard

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