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William Sclater on the General Love of God

February 3, 2009

Sclater:

1)

Beloved of God.] There is a general love of God, whereby he embraces all men; as appears by his beneficence, Matth. 5:45. There is a special love, wherewith he loves his elect in Christ, and of this is the place to be understood.

Wiliam Sclater, A Key to the Key of Scripture, or An Exposition with Notes upon the Epistle to the Romanes. 2nd ed. (London: Printed by T.C. for Nicolas Fussell and Humphrey Mosley, and are to be sold at the Ball in Paus Church yard, near the Great North Doore, 1629), 31.  [Some spelling modernized, underlining mine.]

2)

Now that we may hence observe; The unfaithfulness of ungodly ones in the Church of God, hinders not the accomplishment of God’s promises made to the faithful: see the Lord avowing tis to the Jews Ezek. 18. by reasons; first, all souls are God’s, equally his creatures, equally dear unto him; secondly,  open profession, the soul that sins, and that only dies;’ thirdly, more particular application; handled in comparison of equals; as the rebellious son has no immunity by his father’s righteousness; so neither does the innocent son receive any detriment by the disobedience of the father [Hab. 2:4.]. The Just lives by his own faith [Gal. 6.], every man beares his own burden.

Wiliam Sclater, A Key to the Key of Scripture, or An Exposition with Notes upon the Epistle to the Romanes. 2nd ed. (London: Printed by T.C. for Nicolas Fussell and Humphrey Mosley, and are to be sold at the Ball in Paus Church yard, near the Great North Doore, 1629),  254. [Some spelling modernized, underlining mine.] [Note: Compare Calvin on Eze :18:4.]

3)

Argument of love thus disposed: If I have chosen you and your Fathers, and rejected your Brethren and their Fathers, then I love you; but I have loved Jacob and hated Esau: Ergo. What is meant by his love, Paul best expounds, Rom 9. of Election.

The greatest evidence of God’s love, is Election to Salvation: there is a general love to all Creatures; some token of love to Saul, that he was a King, but nothing that that we are elected: all nothing without Election.

William Sclater, A Brief and Plain Commentary with Notes: Not More Useful, than Seasonable, upon the whole Prophecie of Malachy (London: Printed by J.L. for Christopher Meredith at the sign of the Crane in Pauls Church-yard, 1650), 11. [Note: Compare Calvin and Knox’s like statements on General Love in relation to Malachi 1:2-3.]

[Brief Biography from the Web:

William Sclater (1575 – 1627), Church of England clergyman

William was baptised at Leighton Buzzard, Bedfordshire on 25th October 1575. He was the son of the rector, Anthony Sclater (1519/20 – 1620) and his wife Margaret Loughborowe. William went to Eton College and in 1593 was admitted to King’s College, Cambridge. Three years later he became a fellow and in 1598 graduated with a BA and in 1601 proceeded MA.

His career was subsequently as follows:

  • 1601 Sclater started preaching in Walsall, Staffordshire. He controversially refused to wear the surplice
  • 1604 presented to the vicarage of Pitminster, near Taunton, Somerset
  • 1606, even though serving as rural dean, he was still in trouble for nonconformity
  • 1608 he proceeded BD
  • 1609 was urging other moderate puritans to conform
  • 1611 published the sermon The Key to the Key of Scripture
  • 1612 published the sermon The Ministers’ Portion
  • 1617 proceeded to DD
  • 1619 made chaplain and prebendary of Bath and Wells by Bishop Arthur Lake
  • 1619 presented with the living of Lympsham, Somerset by Lord Poulett (he also retained Pitminster, which he left in the care of a curate)
  • 1623 published the sermon The Question of Tithes

Sclater was a staunch Calvinist and was highly esteemed by leading west-country puritans such as Sir John Horner and Sir John Bampfield. In 1621 Richard Barnard listed Sclater as one of his thirty-four godly ministers to whom he dedicated his clerical manual, The Faithful Shepherd.

In his personal life: He married his first wife (name unknown) in 1609 and through this marriage he had two sons and five daughters. In the 1620s he married his second wife, Marie or Mary, from Mells, Somerset and the couple had one daughter. His eldest son, William, was responsible for postumously editing many of his works. Sclater died in Pitminster in 1627.]

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One Comment leave one →
  1. CalvinandCalvinism permalink*
    March 13, 2009 12:48 pm

    I have updated Scalter on the General Love of God for all men. See comment #3.

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